Studies conducted by the University of Otago which show red meat is a predictor of iron and zinc status in early childhood.

Daniels, L., et al (2018). Modifiable “Predictors” of Zinc Status in Toddlers. Nutrients, [online] 10(3), p.306. Available at: http://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/10/3/306 [Accessed 4 May 2018].

Szymlek-Gay, E., et al. (2009). Food-based strategies improve iron status in toddlers: a randomized controlled trial. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, [online] 90(6), pp.1541-1551. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19828711 [Accessed 4 May 2018].

Studies conducted by Universities of Otago, Sydney and Newcastle which show red meat is a predictor of iron status in young women.

  • Cheng, H., et al. (2011). Iron status of overweight and obese young women presenting for weight management. Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, [online] 5, p.17. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24231018 [Accessed 4 May 2018].
  • Fayet-Moore, F., et al.(2014). Fat Content and Composition in Retail Samples of Australian Beef Mince. Nutrients, [online] 6(6), pp.2217-2228. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4073145/ [Accessed 4 May 2018].
  • Heath, A., at al. (2001). Can Dietary Treatment of Non-Anemic Iron Deficiency Improve Iron Status?. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, [online] 20(5), pp.477-484. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11601562 [Accessed 4 May 2018].
  • Heath, A., et al. (2001). The role of blood loss and diet in the aetiology of mild iron deficiency in premenopausal adult New Zealand women. Public Health Nutrition, [online] 4(02). Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11299092 [Accessed 4 May 2018].
  • Patterson, A., et al. (2001). Dietary treatment of iron deficiency in women of childbearing age. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, [online] 74(5), pp.650-656. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11684534 [Accessed 4 May 2018].

Studies conducted by Deakin University which used lean red meat as a source of protein in combination with strengthening exercise in vitamin D replete to improve muscle health after 65 years.

  • Daly, R., O’Connell, S., et al. (2014). Protein-enriched diet, with the use of lean red meat, combined with progressive resistance training enhances lean tissue mass and muscle strength and reduces circulating IL-6 concentrations in elderly women: a cluster randomized controlled trial. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, [online] 99(4), pp.899-910. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24477043 [Accessed 4 May 2018].

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